Practical Astrology for Witches and Pagans by Ivo Dominguez, Jr. – Book Review

Wow! This was quite a read, which I mean in the best way possible. Unlike other astrology books, this one wasn’t written to teach you how to interpret a birth chart, but how to utilize the celestial system in magical work instead. Despite the author’s poetic yet straightforward style, you might become puzzled and overwhelmed if you’re not familiar with more than just the signs. There’s a lot to absorb, so take your time, perhaps along with notes, to better digest all the information.

The book introduces a brief, but enlightening history of astrology and how the sacred sciences worked compared to modern science. From there it gives a different and deeper perspective of the planets, signs, houses, and aspects. And I mean deeper. Light is shed on the relationship between the microcosm and macrocosm, as well as consciousness and thought forms (or “tulpas”) and how they contributed to the magical realm of the zodiac. The way that this multidimensional cosmic machine is explained isn’t too complicated and is certainly nothing short of insightful.

The aforementioned astrological components, plus the glyphs, are broken down in fluff-less interpretations, showing how they can be used in spells and the creation of ritual essentials, such as amulets and invocations. Moon phases, retrogrades, and planetary returns and transits are also addressed, including many other things that pertain to astrology and metaphysics. Everything connects and is detailed enough for any serious practitioner of magic.

One thing the book emphasizes is the importance of timing to ensure the success of spells. For most practitioners, timing is a must. As for me, a primarily intuitive, spontaneous person when it comes to magic, I’ve had successful results with little to no planning. Being in tune with the flow of things is possible, but largely irrelevant to me. I just embark on too many otherworldly adventures, and I don’t need elaborate rituals in order to do so.

If the line about being more than our genetics and birth charts were true, it shouldn’t be impossible to develop our own flow that can hack the system. The book seems to almost contradict itself with these two distinct assertions. As a species, we’ve achieved plenty of hacks with science, medicine, and technology. Sure, astrology might’ve influenced our discoveries, but they’re still a means of manipulating reality. If we can expand our scope of consciousness, too, what prevents us from manipulating the nature of magic?

Of course, I can’t blame the book for not answering that question because it’s not focused on such a subject. What it does focus on, it delivers and then some. It even suggests creating a sacred space to neutralize the effects of unfavorable astrological conditions, so it’s not totally fatalistic like most astrology books.

Not only are you advised to avoid repercussions by paying attention to the heavenly forecast, but you’re also made aware of opportunities and possibilities to work with current circumstances and transcend challenges. This is by far a one-of-a-kind book that will evolve your understanding of astrology and your magical practice.

Rating

4 and a half full moons out of 5

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